allthingstakenmerrily

The Average Person
The Disgruntled Legislator
The Happy Historian

PSA: if you are a museum guest and know you have a case of resting bitch face, please nod or smile at regular intervals during your tour. Guides frighten easily.

This is also Adlai Stevenson, and he is having none of my floral nonsense.

retrocampaigns:

Interesting article from the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society on Adlai Stevenson and the role television played in the 1956 presidential election.

Speeches were Adlai Ewing Stevenson II’s greatest strength, but they were also his greatest weakness. During the 1950s, when the televised image assumed an increasingly important role in winning and losing elections, Stevenson failed to transcend the image of a speaker. Although eloquent to be sure, he seemed abstracted and detached—an observer rather than a leader. In his 1952 presidential campaign, that image—together with speeches filled with reason, wit, and grace—won the plaudits of many intellectuals. On the other hand, his speeches often confused or bored many other Americans.

Stevenson’s opponent, Dwight David Eisenhower, more practically strove for communication, rather than eloquence. Where Stevenson appeared to make a fetish of reason, Eisenhower recognized that effective communication depended more on stimulating a sense of shared emotion. His highly effective spot advertisements on television identified with the needs and yearnings of ordinary voters.

Eisenhower’s victory, due in part to a sophisticated use of television, taught many Democrats that political success in the future would depend on mastering the arcane techniques of the new medium.

Read more …
"Adlai Stevenson, Television, and the Presidential Campaign of 1956," Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Volume 89, Spring 1996 via the Illinois State Library [PDF]

(Source: idaillinois.org)

ilovecharts:

Information vs Knowledge
via Greg Russell

ilovecharts:

Information vs Knowledge

via Greg Russell

(Source: twitter.com, via low-cal-cal-zone-zone)

everything is just so terrible.

HL

Riding bear back

Riding bear back

a haiku for tuesday
centuriespast:

Der Tod auf der Barrikade (Death on the Barricade)
Plate 5 from the portfolio Auch ein Todtentanz aus dem Jahre 1848 (2nd edition, Leipzig: Georg Wigand, 1849)
Alfred Rethel, German, 1816 - 1859. Engraved by Carl August Zscheckel, German, 1824 - 1870. Wood engraving executed in Dresden under the supervision of Hugo Bürkner, German, 1818 - 1897. With verses composed by Robert Reinick, German, 1805 - 1852. Published in Leipzig in 1849 by Georg Wigand, German, 1818 - 1858.
Published in Leipzig, Germany,1849
Wood engraving
Philadelphia Museum of Art

centuriespast:

Der Tod auf der Barrikade (Death on the Barricade)

Plate 5 from the portfolio Auch ein Todtentanz aus dem Jahre 1848 (2nd edition, Leipzig: Georg Wigand, 1849)

Alfred Rethel, German, 1816 - 1859. Engraved by Carl August Zscheckel, German, 1824 - 1870. Wood engraving executed in Dresden under the supervision of Hugo Bürkner, German, 1818 - 1897. With verses composed by Robert Reinick, German, 1805 - 1852. Published in Leipzig in 1849 by Georg Wigand, German, 1818 - 1858.

Published in Leipzig, Germany,1849

Wood engraving

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Hello
ohthentic:

quite queer

"Sorry, Pooh, but all stories have an ending, you know."

"Sorry, Pooh, but all stories have an ending, you know."

(Source: sailorspuds)